Within Our Reach

2012 Featured Speakers

Cliff Dahm

Cliff Dahm

Dr. Dahm is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in restoration ecology, biogeochemistry, microbial ecology, hydrology, climatology and aquatic ecology. He is especially interested in interactions between surface waters and ground waters in intermittent rivers of the southwestern United States. He is a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He emphasizes interdisciplinary approaches required for understanding aquatic ecosystems. He has served as interim director for the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico and director for the Freshwater Sciences Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at UNM. He has served as a program director for the Division of Environmental Biology of the US National Science Foundation (NSF). He recently served as the lead scientist for the Delta Science Program in Sacramento, California, USA from June 2008 through February 2012. He has worked on river restoration, intermittent rivers, flow criteria, and adaptive management protocols in Florida, Queensland-Australia, New Mexico, and California. Dr. Dahm received a B.S. in Chemistry from Boise State University, a M.A. in Chemical Oceanography from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in aquatic ecology and oceanography from Oregon State University.

Kathleen Dean Moore

Kathleen Dean Moore

Kathleen Dean Moore is best known as the author of award-winning books about our cultural, moral, and spiritual connections to wet, wild places -- Riverwalking, Holdfast, Wild Comfort, and The Pine Island Paradox, winner of the Oregon Book Award. Her recent co-edited book, Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril, gathers calls from the world's moral leaders to honor our obligations to future generations. Currently, Moore's work focuses on the moral imperative of climate change action; her videos and essays can be found at Riverwalking.com. Moore is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Oregon State University, where she is co-founder and Senior Fellow of the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word. She publishes in scientific journals such as Conservation Letters, Journal of Forestry, and Conservation Biology, as well as in literary and popular journals such as Audubon, Discover, and Orion magazine, where she serves on the Board of Directors. A recent extended interview, "When Your House is on Fire: The Moral Imperative of Climate Change" is published in SUN magazine, December 2013. When she is not in Oregon, she lives in a cabin where two streams and a bear trail meet a tidal cove on Chichagof Island in Alaska.

Michael Douglas

Michael Douglas

Dr. Michael Douglas is a Professor of Environmental Science based at Charles Darwin University in Darwin, Australia. He is an aquatic ecologist with research interests in how weeds, fire, grazing and water extraction affect tropical rivers, floodplains and riparian zones. For the past 6 years he has been leading large collaborative research programs aimed at supporting land and water management across northern Australia. He is the Director of the Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge Research Hub (TRaCK) and Director of the National Environmental Research Program's (NERP) Northern Australia Hub. He is currently on sabbatical at Oregon State University and the University of Maryland hosted by the IAN until January 2013. His sabbatical is supported by a Fulbright fellowship to develop a plan for the next phase of the TRaCK research program.

Kendra Smith

Kendra Smith

Kendra manages BEF's model watersheds in the Willamette, which serves as the tributary strategy of the Willamette River Initiative funded by the Meyer Memorial Trust. Prior to this challenging venture, she managed a watershed restoration program in the Tualatin Basin, and served as a private consulting ecologist. She enjoys building and creating things — green houses, restoration projects, watershed plans, even program infrastructure (okay, that is less than fun). Kendra appreciates the power of nature to surprise and humble us at every turn, while at the same time feeding our souls. She enjoys hiking, backpacking, cross-country skiing, and traveling in her free time. Kendra earned a BA in Biology and Economics from Colby College and a MS in Ecosystems Management from Oregon Graduate Institute.

Johnny Sundstrom

Johnny Sundstrom

Johnny Sundstrom is founder and president of the Siuslaw Institute, and coordinated the successful winning of the 2004 Riverprize by the Siuslaw Basin Partnership. The Institute specializes in collaborative approaches to natural resource issues and policy, endangered species, as well as providing educational opportunities in these subjects for local schools. He has worked extensively in the Russian Far East as a participant in the 'Twinning' process resulting from winning Riverprize. He is a co-owner and the manager of a ranching and forestland operation in western Oregon, USA, as well as varsity coach of track & field at the local high school. He serves on several state and national advisory committees dealing with forestry, salmon habitat, and ranching interests. He has recently published a novel dealing with settling the West.

Rose Wallick

Rose Wallick

Rose Wallick is a Hydrologist who joined the U.S. Geological Survey in 2007. Her research draws upon geomorphic mapping, hydraulic modeling, sediment transport analyses and historical datasets to assess river channel response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Rose has been investigating geomorphic processes in the Willamette River Basin since 2000, examining both historical channel change and potential effects of future environmental flow releases. Currently she is leading a MMT and OWEB funded synthesis of geomorphic issues in the Willamette Basin. Other recent projects include several comprehensive studies of gravel transport and channel change on coastal rivers subject to in-stream gravel extraction. Rose received her B.S. from Colorado State University in Watershed Science and a dual M.S. degree from Oregon State University in Geology and Bioresources Engineering. Prior to joining the USGS she worked as a hydraulic engineer for DHI, Inc.

Kelly Warren

Kelly Warren

Kelly Warren is the Willamette Basin Fish and Wildlife Coordinator for the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs of Oregon (CTWSRO). His primary role is to work with cooperating agencies to acquire property to meet BPA's mitigation requirements for the Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Project and to provide a presence for CTWSRO in the Willamette Valley. He graduated from Linfield College with an Environmental Science Degree in 2007 and graduated from Portland State with a Masters of Environmental Management (MEM) in 2010. His professional experience includes working with OWEB from 2007-late 2008 monitoring OWEB's acquisition sites. After graduate school he went back to OWEB to assist in the formation of a new monitoring form for OWEB's acquisitions. Kelly also worked for USFWS Region 7 conducting waterfowl surveys that play a role in forming regulations and management of species that nest on the Yukon-Kuskoquim Delta. Kelly worked in partnership with ODFW to form, Identification Field Guide to Geese of the Willamette Valley and Lower Columbia River. This guide assists with differentiating the 7 subspecies of geese that are found in Oregon's Willamette Valley. His interests include; hunting, fishing, wildlife photography and managing/restoring his families property near Monroe Oregon.

Rob Walton

Rob Walton

Rob Walton is a Senior Policy Advisor with NOAA Fisheries, also known as the National Marine Fisheries Service. He's been with NOAA for 8 years and has worked on ESA salmon and steelhead issues for over 20 years. Among a wide variety of former jobs, Rob was Acting Ombudsman for the State of Alaska — before Sarah Palin — and he worked for the Washington State Senate. Rob is currently NOAA's coordinator for implementing the Upper Willamette Recovery Plan and he's writing the draft recovery plan for Oregon Coast Coho.

Todd Reeve

Todd Reeve

For over 15-years, Todd Reeve has undertaken watershed restoration, flow restoration, and fisheries research and assessment efforts across the West. Todd is a former Vice President of Watershed Programs at the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF), and he is the current CEO, overseeing BEF's Model Watershed and Water Restoration Certificate Programs. He has worked in various capacities for watershed councils, the U.S. Forest Service, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the E.P.A., and private consulting firms. Todd currently leads work with the Meyer Memorial Trust, Russell Family Foundation, and Laird Norton Foundation to help develop comprehensive, long-term, and community-based watershed restoration strategies. Todd has presented at numerous conferences and has published articles in several journals and magazines. He holds an M.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Bachelor's degree from the University of Oregon.

Lawrence Schwabe

Lawrence Schwabe

I graduated with a BS in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University in 1995. My first employment opportunity in fisheries was with the US Forest Service from 1995-1998. I worked on the planning, implementation, and monitoring of stream large wood and boulder placement restoration projects. From 1998-2009, I had the great opportunity to work as a Fish Biologist for a SE Oregon Tribal government. During my time in SE Oregon, I led a collaborative research effort that investigated life history characteristics of bull and redband trout. I also served on a Tribal technical team that successfully acquired over 5,000 acres of habitat for bull trout, redband trout, and various wildlife species in SE Oregon. Since 2009, I am currently employed by the Confederated Tribes Grand Ronde as their Hydrosystem Compliance Specialist. My earlier years with the Tribe, I was part of the technical team that researched general migratory behavior of pacific lampreys in the Willamette Basin. Currently, I evaluate fish and wildlife restoration actions that mitigate the effects of the federal hydrosystem and collaborative work with Tribal Council to assure such actions are consistent with the goals and policies of the Tribe.

Tom Byler

Tom Byler

Tom Byler is the Executive Director of the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, where he is serving a second four-year term. Before OWEB, Tom served as a natural resources policy advisor for Governor Kulongoski and Governor Kitzhaber. Prior to working in the Governor's office, he worked on legislative and policy issues for the Oregon Water Resources Department. He also served on the staff of State Representative Charles R. "Chuck" Norris of Hermiston during the 1995 legislative session. Tom is a fifth generation Oregonian born and raised in Pendleton. He is a graduate of Willamette University and the University of Oregon School of Law.

Kirk Schroeder

Kirk Schroeder

Kirk Schroeder has worked at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife since 1978 and is currently the Project Leader of Willamette Spring Chinook Research. Over almost 40 years as a fishery biologist, Kirk has been involved with numerous studies of Chinook salmon, steelhead, redband trout, and other species throughout the Northwest and has worked his way from the Salmon River in Idaho, to the Deschutes River basin, and onto Oregon coastal rivers. In the last 16 years, Kirk has helped conduct investigations of adult and juvenile Chinook in the Willamette Basin with a recent focus on their complex freshwater life history and implications for recovery. He has been an active member of the American Fisheries Society since the late 1980s and served as President of the Oregon Chapter. He has also been involved with several civic and conservation groups, and enjoys short and extended jaunts into the wild to refresh his imagination.

Stan Gregory

Stan Gregory

Stan got his B.S. degree at the University of Tennessee in 1971, working on fishes of Tennessee during the year and working on Lake Michigan in the summers. He received his M.S. and PhD degrees from Oregon State University in 1974 and 1980, studying streams in the McKenzie River basin. He worked for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in the Pacific Northwest from 1977-1981. He has been a faculty member in the Department of Fisheries & Wildlife at OSU since 1981 and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in stream ecology, limnology, and ecological restoration at OSU for more than 25 years. Stan has been a leader of the Stream Team at Oregon State for more than two decades. He has studied streams, rivers, and lakes in the Pacific Northwest, and has been leading studies of the Willamette River for the last 15 years. His recent research with David Hulse produced a book entitled "Willamette Basin Atlas: Trajectories of environmental and ecological change" in 2002. His current efforts focus on the ecology of the Willamette River and new approaches for its conservation and restoration.

Click here to view the 2010 speaker roster